Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Brain Science & Learning: 7 Tips that Will Dramatically Improve Your Learning

SESSION: Brain Science & Learning: 7 Tips that Will Dramatically Improve Your Learning

Presenter: Art Kohn

Will update this post with a deeper reflection later. Learned so much even though I just jumped in this session

7 Tips Shared:

  • Delivery of Knowledge Bursts
  • Cognitive Boosting
  • Gamification
  • Pre and Post-Assessment
  • Coaching
  • Social Learning – Harvesting best practices
  • Gamification

During the session I created an infographic to support my learning (and remembering ;)).


Optimal Duration of Learning Boosts:

Received Boosts of 5 seconds –> 5 minutes… got the same levels of retention.

Boosting is not reteaching.

What you do after training is important to increase retention.

I want BOOSTER TRAINING FOR THIS LECTURE! So I left my card with my contact info at Prof. Kohn’s table :)

Additional Resources:

Using Comicbook Format in Storyline

Pow (comic text)

SESSION: Story Hero: Create Comics and  Motion  Comics  Interactions with Storyline

PRESENTER: Michael Sheyahshe

Remember to become aware…How we read comic books

Comicbook style interactions, using animations. Place more emphasis on the story.

Comics: create interest, focuses on story points.  Visually communicate ideas and grab your attention.

What Panels do….

Allow you to storyboard content.

  • Reference – Scott McCloud’s icons hierarchy.

Scot McCloud visual hierarchy

  • Comics –> Distance = Time.
  • Closer = less time.
  • Tripping the Z-axis. Translation perceived depth. Simple example = shadow.

Comixology is a great app. Provides examples of how to execute.

Execution recommendations:

  • Keep animation simple. Simple line motion animation can provide a  powerful effect. Remember distance = time.
  • Create your comic layout/ and fill out the panels. Similar to how Prezi works with the zoom feature.
  • Cool – can embed videos in a panel!
  • Put panels on separate layers.
  • Pause each panel and place the timing on the timeline for the layer/panel.
  • You  can add a motion path.
  • Add click interactivity to view next panel or layers. BRILLIANT!!!

Speaker Sheyahshe <YouTube? Channel>

Articulate comic Example

Possible other resources:

Articulate article – Comic style designs in Courses

Usability Back to Basics: Should Links Open in New Windows?

Let me preface this post with the admission that I am not a professionally trained web designer. I have had experience designing web-based learning materials and have knowledge and exposure to Usability and User Experience (UX). Some of the past organizations I have worked for held UX as a primary goal in producing good products. I am still very committed to learning how to provide the most user-friendly solutions to the content I deliver. Happier users are more productive workers.


  1. Should website links to external sites open in new windows?
  2. If so, how do you differentiate links on a site to external pages to links that point back (internally) to the site?

I wanted to do some research on the questions above to help provide answers but also to solve a problem I am facing with a website I have inherited. This site, which I vaguely referenced this site in a previous post, needs a major overhaul starting with a card sort, but the immediate need is to update some of the more visited pages with current information.

The site was created as a hub to connect learners with other content both within and outside of the site. Therefore,the site is linked to both internal and external resources and each page has multiple links. Sometimes dozens of links.*  Returning to the two questions above, I found the camp somewhat divided on opening in a new browser:


YES, open in a new window


NO, do NOT open in a new window

After reading the advice and developer discussions on the sites above as well as additional resources, I’ve come to the conclusion that I will continue to keep external pointing links pointed to opening in new browsers, because they are reference to content outside of our own.  I’m also leaning to proposal #1 below to help guide or teach users where to go.

My proposed solutions to fixing the page content would be as follows:

  1. Train users where to expect internal pointing links vs. external pointing links. If possible keep the internal pointing links together in 1 section at the top of the page. Links that point to an external site are kept in a second section. There are no explicit instructions that warn users, but eventually repeat users learn that anything they click at the top of the page points to the same site, but links on the bottom half are external links. They start to expect the behavior.
  2. Give the users a choice. Have the current link open in the same browser, but provide an icon that allows them to open in a new browser. While this seems like the politest option, from a web developers perspective it is the most labor intensive. Also, it will me you will have to update links in two places.
Proposed temporary solution to web page design.

Proposed temporary solution to web page design.

* I have to resist the desire to say that such hub sites are NOT helpful  to users because their architecture is often not based on personal user experiences.



Part 2 on herding cats: diving into using Six Hat thinking


Six Hats Thinking agenda for feedback

Six Hats Thinking agenda for feedback

Most brainstorming sessions I have participated in frustrate me because it seems that people are so inclined to jump into the part where you solve the problem before you have enough data or information. In an earlier post, I mentioned how useful Edward deBono’s Six Hat Thinking is for herding those proverbial cats in the workplace.  What I really appreciate about the deBono model of facilitation is that it helps bring thoughtful order to collaborative work without forcing participants to use a highly constrictive process. If facilitated smoothly, it allows the group to separate their egos from objective sharing while still giving a voice to intuition and feelings.

Also, most importantly, Six Hat Thinking allows other voices to come into play in discussions other than just those four to five loud ones that typically are most heard the most vocal in many larger group discussions.

Recently, I held a project wrap-up and feedback session built around deBono’s Six Hats. We had a very limited amount of time and we were all pressed to providing meaningful contributions to a discussion after a heavy lunch.   I did find four things most helpful for the discussion’s success.

  • Allow people to gather their thoughts in accordance to the Six Hats thinking model prior to the meeting. I provided an optional worksheet or prompts for the discussion. At least people could frame their thoughts prior to the session rather than feeling as if they had to respond on the spot.
  • Keep the explanation about deBono’s theories and the Six Hats to a minimum while restating the main objective of the feedback session which is to gather information to improve the project management process going forward.
  • Gather the information ahead of time about the project charter (Blue hat thinking) and an initial set of project facts and stats (White hat thinking).
  • Take the colored hats reference out of the agenda but share it later or as part of a handout.

The last piece of advice, I applied last minute to my presentation because I didn’t want to focus primarily on the process of using the hats but on our main objective to gather information to improve our process for future initiatives. The discussion was rushed, however being able to shift between the positive (Yellow hat) and negative aspects (Black hat) of the project before diving into the solution space (Green hat) allowed us come up with a more exhaustive list of areas for improvement.  I was also careful to make sure to include time for the Red hat at the end to express our intuition and emotions about the project because it gave us an opportunity not to achieve some closure, but to express the emotions or thinking that are often pent up during a project as well as to celebrate our feelings of accomplishment and even relief as an end note.

I actually, wished that we had done this more regularly, but upon reflection, if the context and some guidelines (rules) aren’t provided around sharing of emotion and assumptions, discussions might not be as productive as you’d like. This is the part of meeting facilitation that I want to improve at going forward.

You can view the templates and slides I used for my feedback session here:

Slides used (pptx format)


Pre-work template


Slideshare: Being an excellent but quirky boss means you need to get opinions from the “straight men” on your team

It’s hard for one not to like a show that demonstrates spot on storytelling and character development despite its 30 minute format. It’s hard not to like a show that not only makes you excited about music but inspires you to see connections between art and the realities we live in. This show was just plain fun to watch and it re-affirmed to me the importance of passion and commitment as leadership qualities I admire. Maestro Rodrigo embodied these characteristics, and I spent time examining how and why.

Continue reading ‘Slideshare: Being an excellent but quirky boss means you need to get opinions from the “straight men” on your team’

Bathtub management model

Have you ever wondered how much engagement you should have in your team’s projects as a leader and supervisor. This short video on the Bathtub Management Model gives you a new perspective on how hands on you should be with your teams.

5 Things I’ve learned or been reminded of this month

Hopefully I’ll have time to elucidate more later.
Continue reading ‘5 Things I’ve learned or been reminded of this month’


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