Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

Slideshare: Being an excellent but quirky boss means you need to get opinions from the “straight men” on your team

It’s hard for one not to like a show that demonstrates spot on storytelling and character development despite its 30 minute format. It’s hard not to like a show that not only makes you excited about music but inspires you to see connections between art and the realities we live in. This show was just plain fun to watch and it re-affirmed to me the importance of passion and commitment as leadership qualities I admire. Maestro Rodrigo embodied these characteristics, and I spent time examining how and why.

Continue reading ‘Slideshare: Being an excellent but quirky boss means you need to get opinions from the “straight men” on your team’

Bathtub management model

Have you ever wondered how much engagement you should have in your team’s projects as a leader and supervisor. This short video on the Bathtub Management Model gives you a new perspective on how hands on you should be with your teams.

5 Things I’ve learned or been reminded of this month

Hopefully I’ll have time to elucidate more later.
Continue reading ‘5 Things I’ve learned or been reminded of this month’

#dl09- Formalizing informal learning

Preso Description – NA couldn’t find one.

Dublin presented.

See chart I will add reflection later.

This was a particularly helpful session.

Some of the key takeaways:

  1. The concept of  “Informal Learning” is not new.
  2. Between Formal and Informal Learning there is a Grey Area that when asked if a learning piece should be “Formal” or “Informal” we respond… “It depends” (on context, audience, nature, etc.).
  3. Process for Formalizing Informal Learning Includes:
  • Step 1: Get Organized
    • Agree on problem and what success will look like
    • Determine metrics
    • Identify key stakeholders/audiences
    • Formulate approach
  • Step 2: Get Oriented
    • Agree on scope
    • Understand organizational factors
    • Identify weaknesses in current state
    • Identify milestones
    • Recruit
  • Step 3: Get Smarter
    • Architect solution components
    • Develop detailed design
    • Integrate into larger system
    • Mobilize
    • Test, learn, iterate
  • Step 4:  Get Real
    • Continue to learn and iterate
    • Listen and communicate
    • Check your metrics
    • Support and institutionalize

Miyamoto Mushashi’s Rules for Work and Living

 

Miyamoto Mushashi Miyamoto Mushashi

 

 

 

  1. Think of what is right and true
  2. Practice and cultivate the science
  3. Become acquanted with the arts
  4. Know the principles of the crafts
  5. Understand the harm and the benefit to everything
  6. Learn to see everything accurately
  7. Become aware of what is not obvious
  8. Be careful even in small matters
  9. Do not do anything useless

I was on the train the other day and I started re-reading The Book of Five Rings. The nine rules that Mushashi notes are the key to learning military science seem to apply to all endeavors as well… including living. In a way I think most of the problems we face in both life and work stem from the fact that we don’t follow such a set of rules (not necessarily his).  That day, I spent time reflecting on two of my favorite rules.

My first favorite of the rules is ” Become aware of what is not obvious.” Though, you must have a good objective eye and awareness. I don’t think we train enough children and young people today to really wait and notice things. Think about it, we’re all walking around with headsets in our ears listening to our music or podcasts and living in our own encapsulated bubbles.  During my morning walk the other day, I purposely left my headsets at home. I wanted to hear what was going on around me, notice more. Besides there’s part of me that feels that when you’re wearing the sets, you’re a bit vulnerable because you are not really paying attention to what’s going on around you. 

Many of us at work operate in such encapsulation. Sometimes we work in a dysfunctional workplace so we remind ourselves to focus only on ‘our part.’  At the very least, we miss opportunities to function better in our roles, at the very most we don’t see the causes for the dysfunction or how possible solutions for fixing it.  In the cases of some companies or workplaces this the growing dysfunction can lead to financial ruin or bankruptcy. If my experience in life so far has taught me anything, it’s the value of  understanding how the details fit into the larger picture. However, sometimes seeing this picture and using it means you have to do a lot of work.

Still, I can see Mushashi’s rules, like any set of rules,  being misapplied or perverted in the sense that certain individuals can become paranoid and nitpicky when it comes to rules such as “Be careful in even small matters.” There are some people, including myself, who tend to overthink things given enough time on their hands. Perhaps that’s where applying a Zen philosophy towards living comes in. Again, it’s about achieving a certain balance, and observing some unwritten rules of nature. This often stumps us here in the West because we almost always need to have everything explicitly stated for us unless we’re operating on blind faith.

Understand the harm and the benefit to everything. This is so important to me, to understand both the good and the bad sides to the things that enter or influence my life. For example,  why is the Internet great? It puts a wealth of knowledge at my fingertips. Why is it bad? There is so much information I can easily get overwhelemed or side-tracked and I require a greater amount of focus to get my work or even thinking done.  

Still, asking these questions to probe both the ‘good and bad’ of things has served me well throughout my life as long as I can use the information to make decisions well. Plus, there is a part of me that questions blind adherance to anything. Last night at dinner my brother (and husband) spent a bit of time dissing things like twitter and social networking. In their discussion I heard messages like:

  • It’s a waste of time
  • It might be good at first, but once everyone does it, it all becomes noise
  • Why do I care what other people think?

I had to jump in on their piss parade and say, you cannot really make judgements about things until you truly try them. And I suggested that trying Twitter meant more than just loggin in and checking it out for an hour. It means participating in larger conversations or joining groups or communities or doing several searches for keywords and information.  I did acknowledge that this particular social media has become inundated with marketers and advertisers which make it harder to separate the wheat from the chaff, but that there are tools and aps that help you do that. Moreover, I noted that the limitation of expressing yourself in less than 140 character might have an appeal to many people who seek to express their experiences and states of mind succinctly.

So there is a good and a bad to everything. You simply have to take more than a second look.

Epiphany, but too late? Maybe.

Okay so I will confess, I had a job interview the other day and one of the tasks was to create a short training example centered around a learning objective. I actually really enjoy tasks like this so strangely enough the interview process was more fun than something to be feared.

I developed a storyboard for a fairly simple training presentation with an audio sample followed by a reflective activity using guided questions and a worksheet. I was working with the material already presented to me, so having such a short period of time, I decided to leverage what I had.

Now that I think of it, I could have presented the training in a number of different ways, including a Comic Strip or a “Choose Your Own Adventure” type interactive scenario.  The whole experience reminded me that I am reflective. I can come to a situation with a number of ideas and even make a decision on one, but then I will ruminate later on how to do it differently or better. I guess I need to build this reflective time into my project time lines, and actually I think I do this automatically by inserting a ‘draft period’ into everything I do.

Big Question: What Should Learning Professionals Know Today?

Here’s the Learning Circuits Question for July:

In a Learning 2.0 world, where learning and performance solutions take on a wider variety of forms and where churn happens at a much more rapid pace, what new skills and knowledge are required for learning professionals?

Here’s my list of four things I think are most important:

  1. Valuing and working with company and organization leaders to build a “Culture of Learning” or “Learning Organization” via Peter Senge’s Model. Forget being able to launch the next best thing in social networking or Learning 2.0. If this is not a huge part of your company or organization’s mission and culture. You may find an uphill battle in introducing change. In my experience companies who work without a “Culture of Learning” often end up making reactionary moves  instead of ones built around a vision, achievable goals and a realistic plan. They hire reactionary managers and staff, and at the very worst the company devolves into an environment where ‘fires’ are contantly fought and nothing new is really developed.  How can any group or individual really inspire real change in learning let alone innovate in these types of environments?
  2. Understanding possible flows of learning using social media. The Internet has made us incredibly social and increasingly connected with each other. The problem with this is that there are so many avenues for learning and it may be difficult to assess learning that comes as a result of social learning.
  3. Applying constructivism & collaboration to learning online/offline as much as possible. I think developing both collaborative and constructivist activies is going to be necessary for higher-level educators, many of whom are still bent on the traditional methods of teaching via lecture, and for people who develop training for higher education.  The Internet, Web 2.0, Learning 2.0 foster constructivist (websearches, social tagging, forums) and collaborative learning activities (wikis, online discussion) through the media available online. These are the types of activities that not only engage learners, often they reinforce the knowledge and skills so that they’re more likely to be applied effectively in the future. Plus, I’m sorry folks. Learning doesn’t have to be boring and passive like it used to be in the past.
  4. Accepting that you can’t learn everything “2.0.” It’s too easy to be overwhelmed by the rapid rate of development of tools in Learning 2.0. I think being able to develop a strong set of learning goals and objectives for yourself, your company, or your group is a good place to start. Say you need to market your courses better online, then you probably should start looking at how to effectively use social networking sites like Twitter & Facebook. You probably should also read books like the Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell as a primer.

Why?

My place outside of work to explore and make connections with the ideas and things (sometimes work-related) that I'm passionate about.

My Tweets

Blog Stats

  • 252,507 hits

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 105 other followers